DIY & Crafts

Drippy Paint Pots!

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Pretty cool huh?! These were actually really easy, let me show you!

WHAT YOU MAY OR MAY NOT NEED:

A terracotta pot

chalk paint or acrylic paint

acrylic paint

pencil

a wall painting brush

a medium paint brush

a pointed, detailing paint brush

rubber band

a 4″ paint roller and tray

STEP ONE: 

GATHER YOUR SUPPLIES!

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I used the regular terracotta plant pots because they have a fairly rough surface and paired with the chalk paint I knew it would be easy to paint. I bought the larger one in Tesco for 80p and smaller one in B&Q for 47p. You could probably use acrylic for the base, but i’d check on the bottom of the pot first, just in case. I used the chalk paint I already had but if you don’t have any, a small pot is about £4 in a variety of home decorating stores and that would suffice. I love chalk paint because it is almost guaranteed to stick to EVERYTHING.

I used the rubber band like this:

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It makes sure the paint doesn’t cake around the edge of your can, plus it’s easier. I use rubber gloves because I don’t like getting my hands dirty, some handy-woman right? 😉 Also I didn’t even use the tray, because I like the rubber band method, but if you don’t have a rubber band, use the tray! 🙂

 

STEP TWO:

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I used the wall painting brush to paint my white base, but you could just as easily use a large paint brush. I did two coats and used the foam roller to eliminate brush strokes. I then used a 4H pencil (H is easier to rub out) to map out the drips. I did not do this on the smaller pot but it made painting the drips SO much easier. I would highly recommend this step.

STEP THREE:

IMG_20170724_203209To paint the drips I used regular acrylic paint but I would say you could use any paint because most things will stick to the chalk paint. I chose a light blue for the smaller pot and a light turquoise for the larger pot, I didn’t want them to look too samey but I wanted them to sit well together. However as you twirl the pots you can see where the colour varies slightly, I would say to avoid this you should mix a large amount of the colour you like, so it doesn’t run out and the colour will be consistent. If you want to go lighter, always use more white than you think you’ll need.

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In this picture you can see where I made a mistake, I made many of these but they can all be painted over in white. It only took me two coats of acrylic white with the detailing brush to cover this mishap. Also looking at this picture I want to mention, I only painted the inside brim of my pots because I plan on displaying them up on a high shelf, if you want to have them on the coffee table for instance, I would advice painting all of the inside.

These pots were a lot of fun to paint! I would totally do some more but in the spirit of my new journey to minimalism, I had better not.

What do you think? Have you tried this? Let me know! 🙂

 

Lulu x

 

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